Congratulations to Tara (Fabienne) Heuze!

The Queen’s College, University of Oxford is pleased to offer, beginning in Michaelmas Term 2018, a fully-funded graduate scholarship for up to a maximum of three years for a DPhil student in Oriental Studies whose research focuses on Manuscript and Text Cultures with a special focus on Sanskrit (including all areas, historical periods, and aspects of this field).

In October 2018, the John P Clay Graduate Scholarship in Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit was awarded to Tara (Fabienne) Heuze.  

Tara Heuze studied Sanskrit, Old Iranian and the Dramatic Prakrits for her BA and MSt degrees at the University of Oxford, and she is now working towards her doctorate in Oriental Studies at The Queen’s College.

Here is Tara’s description of her DPhil research project.   

Introduction

Beyond Indology, I have a keen interest in literatures more generally: in particular, I like analysing plot construction, page-to-screen adaptation, anti-hero/sympathetic villain characterisations, intertextuality and metafiction in a wide variety of traditions and languages.

DPhil Research

My DPhil is a hybrid project focusing both on Indian epic and dramaturgy: essentially, I want to examine the contrasting depictions of insanity and supernatural interference in dramatic adaptations of epic material, investigating the ways in which certain tropes are manipulated in order to contextualise wrongdoing. I am particularly interested in the parallels between Draupadī and Damayantī's plights in the Mahābhārata’s Dyūtaparvan and Nalopākhyāna respectively; I wish to understand the ways in which the dramatic adaptations minimise their sufferings, and dissociate the heroes from their questionable actions.

Tara Heuze

Content

In the first year of my project, I will be working primarily on a translation (accompanied by commentarial notes) of two plays, Kṣemīśvara’s Naiṣadhānanda ('The Bliss of the Niṣadhan King') and Rājaśekhara’s Bālabhārata ('The Young Bhāratas'), both of which have no European-language translation (as far as I am aware!). The former play deals with the events of the Nalopākhyāna, while the latter, of which only the first two acts survive, chronicles Draupadī's svayaṃvara ('marriage contest') and her humiliation in the Assembly Hall.

After this has been done to the best of my ability, I hope to use these two plays as the primary filter through which I will examine key themes pertaining to 'madness' and 'mental derangement' (e.g. amnesia, obsession, etc.) with regards to wrongdoing, and the extent to which the delineations between these and supernatural influences (i.e. curses and demonic possession) become blurred.

Aim

In embarking upon this project, I wish to make the fascinating world of Indian drama more accessible to those with an interest in theatre beyond Europe, potentially enabling the richness and beauty of Sanskrit poetics to reach a larger audience. I also hope that such translations could generate more forays into comparative studies, since there is so much to be explored regarding the divergences and parallels between different dramaturgical traditions.

Tara (Fabienne) Heuze
Email address:   fabienne.heuze@queens.ox.ac.uk


Original Scholarship Notice

The John P Clay Graduate Scholarship in Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit covers course fees, college fees and a grant for living costs at the same rate as provided by Clarendon Scholarships. Awards are made for the period of fee liability for the agreed course.

The John P Clay Graduate Scholarship in Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit has been established thanks to a generous donation by the JJC Foundation (founded by John P Clay, Oriental Studies, 1954 and his wife Jennifer Coutts Clay) in support of Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit at The Queen’s College.

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals who are applying to a DPhil course at the Faculty of Oriental Studies for entry in October 2018, or current students studying for a DPhil at the Faculty of Oriental Studies. This scholarship may be held in conjunction with other partial awards, but the total value of your scholarships should not exceed the cost of tuition and college fees in full and a grant for living costs at the same rate as provided by Clarendon Scholarships.

The John P Clay Graduate Scholarship in Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit is held in association with The Queen’s College. The successful candidate will be expected to engage closely with its research cluster on Manuscript and Text Cultures (https://www.queens.ox.ac.uk/workshopmanuscript- and-text-cultures).

The scholarship is open to UK, EU, or Overseas students.

Applicants applying for a DPhil in Oriental Studies (with a special focus on Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit) for entry in October 2018, and who submit their application to the University by Friday 12:00 noon, 19 January 2018 at the latest, will be automatically considered. On-course students should submit an application form to Jane Kruz (graduate.admissions@orinst.ox.ac.uk) by 19 January 2018 at the latest. The scholarship will be awarded on the basis of academic merit and potential.

Applications should include:

  • - The John P Clay Graduate Scholarship in Manuscript and Text Cultures: Sanskrit application form
  • - Two reference letters
  • - Curriculum Vitae
  • - Research proposal of up to 2,500 words. Candidates should make clear in the proposal how their project relates to Manuscript and Text Cultures.